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U.s. 20, Rupert Murdoch 12, Don 9, Murdoch 9, Brooks 8, Rebecca Brooks 7, Britain 7, Us 7, Cap 5, New York 5, Rebekah Brooks 4, Washington 4, David Cameron 3, Michele Bachmann 3, Casey Anthony 3, Hollywood 2, Obama 2, Roger Goodell 2, Bachmann 2, Miliband 2,
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  CNN    CNN Newsroom    News/Business. Breaking  
   news and developing stories.  

    July 17, 2011
    6:00 - 7:00pm EDT  

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today, the woman who headed his british newspapers, rebecca brooks, often referred to as rupert murdoch's surrogate daughter, is arrested. hour later, another shocker. the head of the same department that arrested brooks falls victim to the same widening scandal. >> i have taken this decision as a consequence of the ongoing speculation and accusations relating to the mets links with news international at a senior level, and in particular in relation to mr. neal wallace, who as you know was arrested in connection with operation wheating last week. >> what brought sir paul stephenson down? his dealings with neal wallace, who had once been an executive editor of the "news of the world" paper. and that brings us to rebecca brooks. at the top of the murdoch food chain, and possibly the linchpin in an unfolding drama already ensharing britain's corridors of power. brooks is answering police
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questions. >> reporter: in the cozy world of british politics and media, rebecca brooks was at its very center. she wined and dined the rich and powerful on behalf of her boss and mentor, rupert murdoch. brooks first came to news international as a secretary at "news of the world." she quickly developed a reputation for her tenacity as a journalist, reportedly once disguising herself as a cleaning lady to scoop a competitor. described as both ruthless and charming, she was soon the youngest editor of the "news of the world," and shortly after "the sun," both named by murdoch's news international. she spearheaded a controversial campaign to, quote, name and shame alleged pedophiles, publishing their names and addresses in the paper. as the editor of "the sun," brooks testified to parliament that her paper had paid police officers for information. and it was under her editorship that the "news of the world" allegedly paid a private investigator to hack into the
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voicemail messages of millie doweller, the 13-year-old girl murdered in britain whose investigation and court case made front page headlines. those allegations did not come to light until almost a decade later, after brooks had scaled the corporate ladder to become chief executive of news corp international, a position she resigned from last week. she denies any knowledge of phone hacking by her staff. she established a relationship with david cameron, inviting her to lunches at her country home. there have been several arrests in the phone hacking scandal so far, but rebecca brooks is the highest profile yet, and the one closest to rupert murdoch himself. i want to bring in an expert to unattenti untangle this.
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lisa, in 2003, when brooks was an editor for "the sun" newspaper, she admitted to using bugging devices and paying police. listen to this. >> i'll just ask whether they ever paid the police. >> excuse me. >> just the one element of whether you ever pay the police for information. >> we have paid the police for information in the past, and it's been -- >> will you do it in the future? >> it depends on -- >> we will cooperate within the code and the law. if there's a clear public interest, and the same holds for private detectives and video, whatever you want to talk about. >> it's illegal for ploolice officers to receive payment. >> it seemed like she had said too much there. and coulson was arrested earlier this week as well. why wasn't this a bigger deal in 2003? >> i think we got the answer though that today, don, because
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it appears that law enforcement was intimately tied up with this hacking scandal and the corruption scandal at "news of the world" with britain's top cop now stepping down, saying he should have handled things differently. i think we'll really start to see this thing unravel. i believe this is the beginning of the uk's watergreat. there's too much corruption at too high of a level. here is a woman who is admitting, sure, we paid police for information. the police had four years' worth of files of at least 4,000 hacking victims, and they did nothing. they didn't even notify the victims of the hacking. so i think this is really just the beginning of an unfolding scandal that's going to get bigger and bigger as each day goes by. >> lisa, stay there. i want you to hear from hugh grant, the actor who helped to bust this scandal wide open. >> i don't really believe that tony blair dared sneeze without consulting rupert murdoch first. and i'm not alone in that thought. and frankly, it all began with
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margaret thatcher. she was the first pragmatist to think i'm not going to get elected unless i get the press on my side. and that's been the case ever since. >> so, listen, he is saying that it was all the way up to the prime minister. and the prime minister, the current one, david cameron, certainly got it on the floor of parliament this week. so what sort of legal ramifications are there for these british leaders as the dominos fall in this case, lisa? >> well, the first issue is the hacking. what did they know, and when did they know it. were they participants in terms of covering up the hacking? that is criminal behavior in the uk. it's criminal behavior here. and if you knew and you failed to act, you could be considered a co-conspirator. then we're talking about other issues, like paying police for stories. were police on the receiving end of what are effectively bribes for information? you know, my beef with these tabloids, which i write about in my book, they are too big, too corrupt, too destructive, too powerful. here in the u.s., there are basically five media companies that own almost all media.
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and in the uk, it's no different. rupert murdoch and his company simply had too much power. that's why we're seeing high ranking people, even prime ministers, even the head of scotland yard, tied up with this. they had so much power, they had to be kowtowed too. >> lisa bloom, we appreciate that. thank you very much. >> thank you. this scandal is reaching deep now into rupert murdoch's inner circle, and you can be sure that the man at the top is feeling the pressure. murdoch has ads running in seven british papers through monday saying, quote, we are sorry for the phone hacking scandal at the "news of the world." the popular tabloid he just shut down. and here's what he said in his own words.
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the scandal is widening to another murdoch paper, "the sunday times," and now even the fbi is opening an investigation. the allegations, hacking the personal phones of public figures, and the not so public, from murder victims to dead war heroes. >> and there is a firestorm, if you like, that is engulfing parts of the media, parts of the police, and indeed political systems' ability to respond. >> murdoch's news corp, the parent company of the fox news channel, also owns 20th century fox, the fx network, "the new york post," the "wall street journal," harper collins publishing, and probably your local fox affiliate, among many others. the charges against the company are criminal, and could have dire implications not only for murdoch but for the prime minister himself. andy coulson is also a former editor of "news of the world."
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coulson has been arrested for his alleged role in all of this. so the question is, what did his former boss, david cameron, know and when did he know it? >> let me say once more, if i was lied to, if the police were lied to, if the select committee were lied to, it would be a matter of deep regret and a matter for a criminal prosecution. >> order. anybody might think that it an orchestrated noise is taking place. order, order. the house will come to order. and these order -- and these exchanges will continue in an orderly way. mr. ed miliband. >> mr. speaker, the prime minister has just made a very important admission. he has admitted that his chief of staff was given information before the general election that andy coulson had hired a man --
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had hired a man jailed for seven years for a criminal conspiracy who made payments to the police on behalf of "the news of the world." this evidence casts serious doubt on mr. coulson's assurances that the phone hacking over which he resigned was an isolated example of illegal activity. do you know what, mr. speaker? i think the public and the victims of this appalling scandal want us to rise above this and deal with the problems that this country faces. >> mr. miliband? >> mr. speaker, he just doesn't get it. he just doesn't get it. >> i'm afraid, mr. speaker, the person who is not getting it is now the leader of the opposition. as we mentioned, this unfolding firestorm brought to
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light by hollywood actor hugh grant, who secretly taped a former "news of the world" reporter talking about the unsa unsavoury practices that he says that everyone is engaged in. i spoke with paul mcmullen about just who knew what in the news corp organization. were people as high, possibly, as rupert murdoch, complicit in any of this? would rupert murdoch know about these sorts of practices? would people under him know about these sorts of practices? >> yeah. well, people under him certainly should have known. i mean, when rebecca brooks, who was his right hand woman in britain, she was very aware. i was looking at the same books we both had. and we were sending $4,000 a week to private investigators, doing these kind of practices. and it was just extraordinary, you know, if she was the department boss and she then moved up to be editor.
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how could you not notice spending over $100,000 a year on this kind of thing and not even ask what it's for? her position is ludicrous. >> rupert murdoch and his son, james murdoch, have agreed to testify tuesday at a parliamentary committee hearing on this scandal. stay tuned to cnn for developments on this story. a key adviser to afghan president hamid karzai is ass s assassinated near kabul on the same day that nato begins handing over power to the afghan forces. you can reach out to us on twitter, facebook, or cnn.com. also, my book, "transparent," available in ebook and anywhere books are sold. d, that is the weekend. app grapgic: yeah dawg! man 2: allow me to crack...the bubbly! man 1: don't mind if i doozy. man 3: is a gentleman with a brostache invited over to this party?
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the taliban claim a new success in their attempts to weaken the government of afghanistan. a key adviser to president hamid karzai, john mohammed khan, was killed inside his home today by three attackers. president karzai's half brother also a government official was assassinated less than a week ago. in egypt, new signs that the health of hosni mubarak is deteriorating. the deposed president slipped into a coma today before regaining consciousness. hospital officials say his condition is now stable. mubarak has been hospitalized since april. the former strongman is said to be dealing with complications from cancer. he faces trial in august on charges of ordering the killing of protesters during egypt's revolution. the health of venezuela's president is in doubt after hugo chavez flew back to cuba for cancer treatment last night. chavez says he'll receive chemotherapy as part of an
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aggressive treatment plan. he hasn't revealed what kind of cancer he has. president chavez spent less than a month in venezuela after an earlier trip to cuba. he is resisting calls to relinquish power. is there a deal on the debt talks? another line has been drawn in the sand. we'll talk about that next.
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cut, cap, and balance gets us out of debt over a long period of time and we'll have a
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balance the budget amendment requirement to stay out of debt. i think that's the republican position. >> if all else fails, if our efforts to adopt legislation to cut the deficit put a straitjacket on it and balance the budget -- >> we need to let law enforcement work here. congress has got a big issue in front of us. we need to handle our own business for a change, and the focus this week is on the only plan we've got, and that's cut, cap, and balance. all right. cut, cap, and balance. talking points. phrase of the weekend. apparently when it comes to the debt ceiling debate. but what the heck does it mean? and is it just more of the inside washington jargon that flies over the heads of american people that just want lawmakers to do their jobs and come to some sort of agreement? let's bring in now will cane and elsie granderson, senior writer for msnbc.com.
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lz, cut, cap, and ballance all the rage among republicans. is this the key to getting a deal done by august 2? >> i don't think it's the key to getting a deal done, but it's a nice catch phrase they came up with. they have a great publicist. i'm really happy for them. i almost spilled my coffee this morning listening to lindsey graham talking about this is the real deal. we need to get away from this catch phrase rhetoric that speaks to the base and talk about real solutions that are tangible and not just kind of myst mystical. >> will, if you watch the shows this morning, that's all you heard. someone asked a question about news corp, and the guy responded by saying, we'll let that play out. but we have to get this cut, cap, and balance. >> my gosh, stick to the talking points. go ahead, will. >> well, i'm going to crucify talking point as quickly as the next guys. but this is the only plan on the table. you want to talk about tangible, this is the only tangible plan
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on the table. it will be voted on this week. president obama has not put forth a plan. now, this plan is not going to pass. but it is real. it's the only plan out there. >> i'm not talking about the plan. i'm just talking about the talking points. and you know someone said, stick to the talking points. >> it's a cute marketing phrase. >> that's all i'm saying. will, i know democrats have their own division as well, but obama's opinion is really the only one that matters on that side. aren't internal divisions among the republicans the real reason we don't have a deal yet? >> it is a real problem, don. no doubt about it. it's hard to get all of the republicans on the same page behind a plan. this week, you'll probably hear a pretty unified voice but it's not going to pass the democratic controlled senate or the president's desk. everybody will fall back on mitch mcconnell and harry reid's plan b. that's what will happen. i'm forecasting it a week ahead of time. >> lz, why does it seem like every time congress gets into
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these big debates and looming deadlines they toss around this inside washington jargon? and i mean democrats and republicans. >> because it's jargon. it's really to confuse voters into just figuring out which person they like more, versus which plan they like more. if they talked plainly that the average american can understand, then we could separate the wheat from the shaft. now they can fall back on a good or bad feel being this or that person. i think it's ridiculous they are even going through this cut, cap, and balance conversation. will is right. it has no chance of passing. why are we wasting our time doing it? >> let's move on. will, i want to talk to you about bachmann. markus bachmann. not michelle backman. his counseling practice says he encouraging gay patients to encourage their sexual orientation. what does this mean for the
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bachmann campaign? >> let me say this, don. a, this topic is not conducive to a 30-second conversation. i'm not a religious guy and i don't want michele bachmann to be president. but i think the outrage at marcus bachmann is misplaced. i feel like the proper outrage and what you're really feeling is that religion deems homosexuality wrong. from that premise, it logically follows that you would use some kind of religious counseling to control an impulse that religion says is wrong. i think you need to refocus this. all of us into a smarter debate. >> and listen, marcus bachmann is certainly getting caught up in it. we showed the video of them dancing, and also comedians like jon stewart had a lot of fun with that on "the daily show." >> i think this man's views are terrible. and he dances and sounds not only gay but center square gay. >> i mean, lz, is stuff like that fair? >> i don't know if it's fair to
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insinuate that michele bachmann's husband is gay. but i have to chuckle because there are moments that i don't know if i'm listening to him or to cameron from "modern family." there's definitely some humor to be had lehere. these clinics are sending a very bad message, not just to people who are gobt, but people who are allies in the fight for ending homo phobia. >> let's talk about the bigger picture here. will, i'm wondering if bachmann and sarah palin get all the attention nowadays, but the man with the moneyresume, and we're talking about mitt romney, is really off the radar. is he just standing by because it's early on and letting the crazy play out? >> yeah. i think so, don. i think it's a smart strategy. also i'd add john huntsman to that group as well.
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they are sitting back kind of above the fray, and letting the silliness fly. let's not dismiss michele bachmann. she has a serious chance to be the nominee. i hope that she doesn't end up being it. but i like romney's strategy better. >> all right. will, lz, thank you both very much. appreciate it. >> see you, fellas. >> thank you. rebecca brooks is arrested and questioned, and london's police commissioner announces his resignation all in connection with that scandal. and later, got nails? we call her mama jazz. and you'll meet her straight ahead.
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let's check headlines right now. two major developments in the phone hacking scandal and bribery scandal involving rupert murdoch's news corp. rebecca brooks, former editor of "news of the world," has been arrested and is now being questioned. brooks, who is often called murdoch's surrogate daughter, was the head of news corp's british newspapers until she resigned on friday. and this london police commissioner also resigning over his connection to a former executive editor of "news of the world" paper. >> happy birthday. i wish you everything that is beautiful. he's been a grandfather. south african native charlize theron wishes one of the best known freedom fighters a happy birthday.
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nelson mandela turns 93 on monday. south africans are asked to volunteer 67 minutes to service representing each year mandela fought against the segregationist policies of apartheid. ♪ it's a celebration ♪ celebrate good times ♪ come on >> celebration from kool and the gang was the latest wake-up song for the crew onboard "atlantis." day 10 of america's last shuttle flight. the song was played for mission specialist sandy magnus seen with her other crew members here. and today they answered questions from middle school students. not only was there no ka nocarmageddon, but it ended early.
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people stayed away, avoiding a monster gridlock. and crews completed the bridge demolition early, so the 405 opened at noon local time today. after being under police and public scrutiny for more than three years, casey anthony is now free, but we don't know exactly where. anthony walked out of an orlando jail just after midnight. 12 days ago, a jury acquitted her of murdering her daughter, caylee. about 1,000 people were outside the jail in protest. >> caylee! caylee! caylee! >> security was high. her attorneys say she's had multiple death threats. well, it was nail biter in women's soccer at the world cup today. the japanese beating the u.s. in a shootout. we'll have a live report coming from germany and new york straight ahead. efpl,[f=aymh:l p bring it.
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u.s. women's soccer team was on the wrong end of the score in the thrilling world cup final today. japan on penalty kicks after ending extra time at 2-2. the loss, well, it ends a run to
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the final that won over fans in the u.s. and even abroad. lucky lady was at the final in germany. and she joins us now. ok, so i'm sure you used to live here on this side of the pond, as you say, and you were sad for the u.s. ladies, i'm sure. >> reporter: i was. it was really disappointing for the u.s. team, don. they played their hearts out. they were the strong favorites coming in. they were feeling good and confident this game, and played really well. the atmosphere was electric. there was so much support with chants of usa constantly, but they missed a lot of opportunities at the beginning of the game, don. even in the first minute, they could have been ahead but they aren't able to do it. finally, the 22-year-old sub came onto the pitch, alex morgan, and managed to score. she is the youngest player on the team. that put them ahead. minutes later, the japanese came in, because there was kind of a miscommunication in the american defense line.
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and ali krieger kind of tapped the ball onto the japanese attacker's foot, and she was able to capitalize. abby wambach, amazing striker, really called the beast by the coach because she is so good, put a goal in. and then the japanese managed at the last minute, in extra time, to kick it in. the captain of the team did that. and as you know, the u.s. lost in penalties. but it really was an amazing match. it was a nail biter. and even though the u.s. didn't make history here tonight, they didn't get what they wanted, but we should give them a two thumbs up for making us all feel proud. they did a fabulous job. >> zain, i'm going to start calling you to do sports on this show. you knew all the players, all the moves, you got it. did the crowd have a clear favorite here? the u.s. or the underdog japan? was there a clear favorite? >> well, japan were the
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sentimental favorites. you know, nobody expected them to get here. they were the underdogs the whole tournament. they knocked out the germans and the swedes who were twice their height. they played with less height and more heart. the u.s. were the favorites coming in, because everyone thought they would win. they have more speed, strength, and stamina and really know how to hustle. the japanese later in the match showed off their skill and their poise, and they really did hustle at the end, and they managed to get it. but they were the underdogs of the whole tournament. >> and making it more of an underdog. i have to ask you this. did it mean a lot to japan? i'm sure it did, a country that has been through so much the past several months. and you have been reporting a lot on it as well, with the earthquake and the tsunami, zain. >> yeah, it did. the coach was even showing the team pictures right before the germany game at least that we know of, of the devastation of the tsunami just to motivate
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people. a lot of the women on this team have friends and family who were affected by the tsunami. in fact, one of the players used to play for the team at the fukushima daiichi nuclear power plant that was affected by the athletic and the tsunami as well. and she also played for tepco, the local power company in japan as well. so they really had a lot riding on this. not only to uplift the game of women's soccer around the world, but for their country. and it really gave japan a feel good story that they needed. and even the u.s. players were saying, you know, they wanted to win, but japan also had a heart in this game. >> i'll be checking my mailbox for a little souvenir from the game. thank you, zain. appreciate it. i know it will be there. >> all right. i'll send you one. now a look at susan reacting in new york before we go to her, take a look at this.
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>> oh, my gosh. that was funny. u.s. soccer fans can only wonder about what might have been, but fans can look back on a tournament that provided plenty of highlights and good moments for people like susan, who watched the game with fans at a bar in new york. and she is joining us now. you were partying there, susan. i didn't know you had it in you. >> reporter: yeah. it's kind of lonely in here now, don. i think someone let the air out of the room. but now the dinner crowd has come in. the game crowd is outa here. but like zain was talking about, an electric crowd. the sparks were flying in here too. everyone was on their feet for the most part. it was standing room only really in this place. it's called zoom snyder's. if you're a soccer fan and you're in lower manhattan, this is the place to be. obviously, the u.s. fans not happy with the outcome. but, you know, they took their licks and also said, hey, it was
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a great game. here's how one fan summed it up. >> it's heartbreaking, the result. congrats to japan, though. they needed it the most. that's really all you can say. >> reporter: anyway, in the end, everyone agrees, it's good for the game. especially for young people coming up. they like to see soccer become more popular. i know we talk about this every time world cup games come up. but it's the truth. and everyone loves the game. they really got involved here. and after all, you know, they said next time, four more years, right, don? >> it's good stuff. but we have to remember it's only a game. susan, in the 1999 players became american heroes and cultural icons. tharm? can these players have a similar impact on the game even though they lost? >> reporter: oh, yeah. it's kind of hard to hear because it's so noisy in here. but i know that they were really behind this team. i know it was the last chance, and these fans said for some of
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the members of this team, but they said, heck, you know, people will look up to them. they'll want to follow them. you know, especially if they are soccer fans and get them involved in the game in years to come. so everybody walks away with something. one of the best things to watch here was that you really had a big ntingent of japanese fans that were here too. and everybody got along with each other. everybody lifted a beer glass at the end. so everyone leaves as friends. no matter the outcome. >> all right, susan. we want to tell that your injury had nothing to do with the people in the bar. you had that little booboo before you went in there. coming up, all the stories affecting your week ahead. and more on world cup soccer.
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now to the big stories in the week ahead from washington to hollywood. we begin tonight with the pentagon. >> i'm barbara starr at the pentagon. the big news this week, general david petraeus on monday will leave afghanistan as commander of that war, and be replaced by marine general john allen.
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petraeus will retire from the army after decades of service, come back to washington, and head the central intelligence agency. i'm paul steinhauser. tim pawlenty tomorrow will begin a five-day swing through iowa. doing well there is crucial for his hopes of winning the republican presidential nomination. wednesday, what's being billed as the first-ever twitter presidential debate. six candidates will take part in the event. i'm poppy har low in new york. a long awaited watch dog agency in new york opens its doors on monday. they will inspect the books of the country's biggest banks to be sure they are abiding by current credit card laws and respond to consumer complaints. but the white house has yet to appoint the director due to opposition in congress. also key reports this week on the housing market and also earnings from ge, coca-cola, wells fargo, and caterpillar. we'll track it all for you on cnn money.
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i'm carlos diaz. here's what we're watching this week. casey anthony aftermath. the frenzy following casey anthony's release from jail. plus, the end is here for "entourage." we'll talk to all of the stars from the hit hbo show. cat catch "show biz tonight" right here on hln. thank you, guys. summertime heat continues to wear people out. this time, it's the middle of the nation. and they are certainly feeling it. jackie is joining us. the heat is on. it is summer. >> i know. everybody is like it's heat, it's no big deal. but this is a big deal. this is impacting millions of people. and two reasons that i think this heat wave is really significant. number one, the really extreme temperatures are hitting places that normally don't get this high. we are getting close to record levels across parts of the midwest. minneapolis, 108. that's the temperature your body feels right now due to the combined effects of the heat and the humidity.
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100 in chicago. 103 in kansas city. and it's 105 in dallas. we're expecting to see this a little bit more in this area. but today's day 15, where you've seen the triple digits. that is a very long period of time. and the heat is going nowhere anytime soon. we have kind of a blocking pattern set up. from international falls, minnesota, all the way to central parts of texas, we're expecting to see the heat indices anywhere between 100 to 115 at least through wednesday. this is a long duration eechkt. factor number two, why i think this is a big deal, this has to do with the overnight temperatures. we always talk about, oh, my gosh, it's going to be 110. overnight lows, low 80 degrees. take a look at that. for a couple of days. so no period of time throughout this next couple of days where you have any chance to cool off. all right. another thing that's kind of heating up, and that's the tropic. we have tropical depression number two that just formed in the last hour.
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it's got winds around 35 miles per hour. down here just to the north of the bahamas and off the coast of florida. it's taking a turn on up towards the north near the coast, but at this time we're really not expecting it to have much of an impact on the u.s. don? water. that's it. it's all about staying hydrated. >> yeah. all right. there we go. thanks, jacqui. >> you did it. not me. much of the country was keeping a close eye on the women's world cup soccer final, including the obamas. the first family. i'll be talking about that next with pablo torrey of "sports illustrated." we'll see you on the other side of the break. [ woman ] we take it a day at a time.
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the women's soccer world cup is going on in germany right now. today, france hammered canada 4-0, and this was the highlight. it's our women's world cup play of the day. ♪ >> you cannot take your eyes off it for even a second. for even a second.
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[ laughter ] >> okay. jimmy kimmel wasn't excited by the world cup soccer but a lot of the country of. they were very excited today as underdog japan the team won a thrilling shootout victory over the u.s.. let's talk about it. you see the new sports illustrated cover there, talk about derek jeter. the japan team, cinderella story, everybody is behind the u.s. team. there's something true nobody cares about women's soccer until you get to this point, right? >> the bottom line every women's world cup is a referendum on women's soccer and women's sports in general. america can get up for the big game. we can get up for the final and olympics. remains to be seen where we can get a bleed over effect, spillover from these big events going down to the pro level to division i college level and hopefully to women soccer fans.
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this game and this run by the u.s. team and its phenomenal victory by japan cab foot hold, a process of erosion, getting people to care more and more about these games seasonally. >> the excitement over this extended to the white house where president obama and his family were watching. same excitement as in 1999 when the u.s. women won there and didn't carry over. so is this just a sport that gets attention during the world cup and the olympics? again, i'll ask you that in a different way. that going to be -- is that true? does the u.s. care about soccer, men or women? >> there's a big irony here in that the u.s. is so a soccer country when it comes to the youth level. the soccer mom is an american institution. we know everybody, our neighbor's kids. how do we get americans to care about the actual games. what you're asking is a question
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i think that sports fans and observers have wondered about so long. i don't know if the american mentality necessarily just has the attention span may be too short for soccer. maybe they don't understand the nuances of the game. this women's world cup has shown the greater virtues. >> i have to say this. what you're in your 20s, 30s. i didn't play soccer. i didn't know anybody who played soccer. i'm in my 40s. that's a new phenomenon this whole soccer thing. >> long way to go. >> let's switch gears and talk baseball. mistrial this week for roger clemens on charges of lying to congress about using performance enhancement drugs. will prosecution try him again? >> they are going to try. on september 2nd there will be a hearing to decide whether the judge will allow a retrial which is in doubt in the first place. due to double jeopardy rules the judge discussed this may not be an option. let's get this straight.
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this is a humiliating outcome for the federal prosecutors involved. they had a strong case at least in the court of public opinion against roger clemens. they had this guy nailed to a wall with the evidence they had. the judge called this inadmissible testimony a mistake a first year law student wouldn't make. for anybody who questioned spending millions of dollars prosecuting a baseball player was a bad idea the government just hand ud your strongest piece of evidence yet that this could just be a big waste of money in the end. >> we're close to the end of the nfl lock just, one player took some verbal shots saying he hates commissioner roger goodell. what do you think? will we have an nfl agreement this week as well? >> yeah. to the nfl lock outagreement i think all reporters right now
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are thinking we'll get something before the end of the month and fingers crossed on that. almost a five month long process. we deal with james making statements like this. what was he thinking is what the pittsburgh steelers, roger goodell and his teammates are thinking. james harrison, a great linebacker, entertainer on the field but he has the discretion of a machine gun. the guy was fined $100,000 last year by commissioner goodell. there was a concussion crisis. he hasn't learned his lesson. this guy remains the nfl's embarrassing uncontrollable i different, more or less. >> thank you very much very much. take a look at this. nails as long as 26 inches. we'll talk to the woman known asthma ma jazz. see the faces here in the studio.
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she will show how she functions with them all coming up next. the cream hydrates to firm at night. gravity doesn't stand a chance. regenerist, from olay. woman: saving for our child's college fund was getting man: yes it was. so to save some money, we taught our 5 year old how to dunk. woman: scholarship! woman: honey go get him. anncr: there's an easier way to save. get online. go to geico.com. get a quote. 15 minutes could save you 15% or more on car insurance. my son and i never missed opening day. but with copd making it hard to breathe, i thought those days might be over. so my doctor prescribed symbicort. it helps significantly improve my lung function, starting within 5 minutes. symbicort doesn't replace a rescue inhaler for sudden symptoms. with symbicort, today i'm breathing better,
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announcer: when life's this hard, it's no wonder 7,000 students drop out every school day. visit boostup.org and help kids in your community stay in school. a stunning turn of events in the deepening and embarrassing hacking andbriber scandal.
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today rebekah brooks often referred to as murdoch's surrogate daughter. and the head of the same department that arrested brooks, metropolitan police commissioner falls victim. what brings sir paul stevenson done. the executive editor of the paper. back to rebekah brooks. at the top of the murdoch food chain and a lynch pin in an unfolding drama. brooks is answering police questions. >> reporter: the crisis surrounding rupert murdoch's media empire here in britain has claimed new victims as of sunday. first, rebekah brooks, the former "news of the world" editor and chief executive at news international, she had an appointment on sunday to meet with police investigators. but a spokesperson for her said
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she did not expect to be arrested when she walked in to meet with them but that's exactly what happened and she was still in police custody late into sunday night being questioned not just on phone hacking allegations, but also on allegations that "news of the world" reporters actually paid police for information. now rebekah brooks is, of course, a very senior executive at news international, very close to rupert murdoch, she's known as a top lieutenant and he acted as mentor for her throughout all this. she's the 10th arrest in these ongoing investigations into phone hacking. and clearly the most high profile. she really sits at the nexus of british political power and the british media. so that sent shockwaves throughout britain. and as if that wasn't enough, just hours later, britain's top cop sir paul

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